Gasworks Park & Burke Gilman

Gasworks Park & Burke Gilman


The Burke-Gilman Trail is a 27-mile multi-use, car-free trail that winds through Seattleā€™s northern neighborhoods, passing by numerous interesting sights, including one of its early endpoints, the fascinating and unique Gasworks Park. The Burke-Gilman runs, in various sections, from Golden Gardens in Ballard, east through Fremont to the University of Washington, then turns north towards the suburbs of Bothell and Woodinville. It is used on a daily basis by people running, biking or roller-blading either for exercise or as part of their commute. Gasworks Park is a popular place to begin these excursions and a popular place to enjoy the outdoors in Seattle in general.

Converted from an old coal gas plant, Gasworks Parkā€™s notable eponymous feature is the large industrial structures left from its previous incarnation. The structures underneath the barn that dominates one end of the park have been painted and refurbished to be a one-of-a-kind play structure for children to climb on. The nearby picnic tables and barbecue grills make it a great place for outdoor gatherings. On the other side of the park there are viewpoints onto Lake Union and the ship canal, as well as a large hill known as the Great Mound or Kite Hill. Made from a large pile of building rubble covered with topsoil, it affords visitors great views, as well as the opportunity to tell time using their own shadow via the sundial atop it. As can be inferred from its other name, the winds here also make it a great place to fly kites. Looking west from the top of the hill, you can see the Burke-Gilman Trail wander towards Puget Sound, where it terminates at Golden Gardens Park.

The Burke-Gilman Trail goes west from Gasworks, with its western terminus debatably at Blyth Park in Bothell. From there, however, the Sammamish River Trail continues to Marymoor Park in Redmond. When Thomas Burke and Daniel Gilman first created the trail as a road in 1885, it actually went from downtown to Arlington in the north and east to Snoqualmie Falls. It was in 1978 that the 12.1 miles that are the core of the trail (Gasworks to Blyth) were made into a public trail and named for its creators. The Burke-Gilman trail now winds gracefully through the north of the city, used by so many people as part of their daily life, but is also a great way to see much of the city.




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